Is Hongkonger a Bully? Or the World Bullying Hongkonger?

Look at this column of Rahul Jacob in Financial Times,

he mocks Hongkonger with a comic of Falkland Islands in which two residents said “it’s been a while since anyone’s fought over us” when the UK and Argentina is still fighting for it just now. Nobody wants Hongkonger. We know who we are. Everybody just say Hongkonger bullied the girl on train and totally ignored the story that the guy was bullied by the tourists for speaking bad Mandarin. Even if the guy scolded the girl, the Western media therefore revenge for the girl by bullying all 7M of helpless Hongkonger together with 1.3 B raising powers. That’s justice. We are deserved to be treated like dirt in our own place.

This article also directs to New York Times and Bloomberg.

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6 thoughts on “Is Hongkonger a Bully? Or the World Bullying Hongkonger?

  1. I am sorry to see these words. Although my English is not good enough, let me say a little bit about that.
    Is that justice? I am not agree with this view. Many and many video resources that uploaded on youtube shows the fact. The Hongkonger is just trying to ask the girl to stop eating in the beginning, and what did her mother do? She scolded that resident. It’s known that POLITENESS and DEFERENCE is very important in Hong Kong, and i believe it’s the same in western countries. That lady just defied this common value; she scolded someone who tried to persuade her for her behavior. Her disesteeming action on the common value is the main reason that brought her unwanted experience.
    I am quite disappointed on that comics above. If such thing happened in western countries unfortunately, the same result would certainly be given. We should esteem someone that esteems himself/herself, shouldn’t we?

  2. Hi I can assure you that in my soon-to-be published article on the University of Nottingham China Policy blog I have not ignored the point and issues you have mentioned. Please feel free to support my article by linking to it when it is published here: http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/chinapolicyinstitute/ in the next few days. I have tried to be balanced and present a fair and reasonable assessment of the situation from the position of an outsider who has experience both of the mainland and Hong Kong from personal and professional persectives. I hope it is helpful to all concerned. Thank you for your updates and efforts.

    • I’m more than glad that even scholar can tolerate my Chinglish. I will link your article when it is published. I can tell you that Hong Kong netizens are quite depressed because they think that they are bullied by both China and the World.

    • I read your article. A rarely seen balanced view on what’s happening between HK and China. Just wish the media nowadays adhere to the same standard.
      I am glad that you touched upon the fact that HKers are very different from Mainland Chinese for historic reasons. Mainlander cannot expect HKer to be speaking in Mandarin just because they are Chinese by blood. Otherwise, all the second generation, hypenated American, Canadian, British etc are just as gulity as HKers.

  3. When I revisited HK, I just eat right before I have to go on the train, buy a bread bun in the station store, eat next to the trashcan and discard trash, takes me…10 seconds? Obey the rules! They are there because HK is very very crowded. In Toronto, Canada, eating on the transit is allowed because we are not as crowded, except during rush hours, where you will receive a car full of glares if you eat when everyone is packed in like sardines.

    If the rule forbid eating on the train, and it doesn’t take long to travel on the train, you don’t! If it’s inconsiderate to other people (rush hour everywhere in the world), you don’t! Sometimes someone might be REALLY hungry and in a hurry, if so, when confronted, you should still apologize and politely request understanding.

    The ugly thing wasn’t the girl breaking the rule by eating on the train, it was the mainland behaviour of rudely abusing one’s might over common shared and obeyed rules.

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